2015

Butterflies In My Keys

I had a chance to try out the new keyboard on the new MacBook. I really like the keyboard on my current MacBook Air, so I was a bit apprehensive about trying the new keyboard. When Apple announced it I thought, “Oh no! I like this keyboard.” After I read about it on Apple’s website I relaxed, but I still had to have my fingers on it to be sure I would like it. As it turns out, I love the new keyboard. I loved it at first touch. It is the keyboard of my dreams – almost. The only thing closer to dream state typing would be if the nerve endings in my fingers produced text without moving my fingers. With this new keyboard from Apple there will be no more “banging out” of text, no more “clickety-clack” (not that there’s clickety-clack now, but this keyboard insures that it’s a thing of the past). If there had been a Bluetooth version of the Butterfly Keyboard in the store, I would be typing on it now.

As we wait for the WWDC Keynote 2015 (June 8) for announcements I am thinking about what I would like to see and hear about. Naturally, there will be announcements of improvements and new features in the operating system. I’m not sure we need new features right now. Apple proclaimed Mavericks would work on computers as far back as 2007. OK for Mavericks, but that has to change for any new operating system I think. I have Yosemite on a 2012 computer and it works best when I restart the computer once or twice a day. But that’s not what I should be talking about since I don’t know why it is that way.

What I would like to see, number one, is that new keyboard in a Bluetooth version. Next, I expect, soon, if not in this keynote, a new Mac Pro with all the updated ports that we will need (like Thunderbolt 2, or 3 or 4, and whatever else we might need.

If there is a Bluetooth version of the new keyboard, there will probably also be a new version of the Bluetooth trackpad. I wasn’t testing for the trackpad (the new “Force Touch” trackpad) when I tried out the new MacBook, but it seemed to me that it took slightly more pressure to indicate a click or make a selection than on the MacBook Air trackpad or the Bluetooth Magic Trackpad. I have become accustomed to light, one and two finger touches on both of these trackpads, although more things require an actual click in Mavericks than in Yosemite it seems.

Another thing I would like to see, at the same time not holding much hope I will see, is an iPod Touch with specs on par with an iPhone; in other words, an iPhone without the phone part. Or, not seriously expecting that, iPads, regardless of size, with equal or near equal specs. It would make choosing an iPad so much easier. And the ability to transfer documents from an iOS device to our computers easily, without complication, and without relying on cloud services, or wifi, or the internet at all when the device is attached.

Many people are waiting for and wanting the new 27-inch Retina display as a standalone display. This would most likely only work on a new Mac Pro. Currently this display is attached to the new Retina iMac.

The display on the new MacBook is excellent. I asked the salesperson if they were selling a lot of them. I was told that people wanted a bigger screen. Looking at the new MacBook and the MacBook Air side by side, I knew I would not hesitate to take the 12-inch Retina screen over a 13-inch regular screen. Ah, but there are times when I need to have two USB things plugged in at the same time. Two USB ports on a portable computer is enough I think, but I don’t want to need a separate “hub” for this. What I would like to see is a single adapter with two USB ports and a USB-C port for power as most USB devices draw some power. I expect this to be available by the time I am ready for the new MacBook, but I will buy a Bluetooth Butterfly Keyboard as soon as I know it’s available.

When I started writing this piece I had only intended to write about how much I liked the new keyboard, but I’ve gone past that already, and there is one more thing I have questions about. Apple TV. The announcements about Apple TV at the last Apple Special Event sounded great. HBO, I would sign up for that; I have a lot of catching up to do. But how do you get it? An hour of HD video is nearly a gigabyte. Where will that come from? Cable? I wouldn’t sign up for cable if they were giving it away. Dish provider? Seems as outdated as cable. Phone “carriers” with their measured and throttled service? No way. I have long expected Apple to provide, at reasonable cost, or free or near free, internet bandwidth for users of Apple products through some sort of wireless service. This service should be so good that users of non-Apple products will pay enough, or more, to make up for the discounted or free use of it Apple users will have. Maybe I was dreaming, but Apple has made dreams come into fruition before.